After creating a new auto scaling group recently, I was looking for an easy way to test the auto scaling policies I’d associated with the group. This is just quick post to cover what I did as a quick way to test auto scaling policies. I configured my group to scale up when it breached a 50% usage threshold, then scale down again once usage dropped below that value. One way to test it was working as desired is to use the Stress tool, which can be installed on Linux instances. Note that I was using the micro instances available in the free tier to ensure not to incur any unnecessary costs, whilst testing. Stress can be installed on Linux instances by running:

# yum install stress -y

Once installed, CPU load can be generated using Stress by running: [click to continue…]

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I’ve recently been working towards AWS certification – and took the first step in passing the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate exam a few weeks ago. After a short break I now aim to take the Professional cert later in the year – as such I’ll be putting some articles together covering some of the core topics needed for the exam. In this one I’ll look at running through configuring a new VPC.

Configuring a New VPC

There are a number of components (or building blocks) that we will need to use when creating a new VPC. These include a defined CIDR block for the VPC (this defines the private IP address space for everything that is created within the VPC), subnets, internet and NAT gateways, route tables, network access control lists and security groups. With these ‘building blocks’ we can build a secure virtual network to host our EC2 instances and other resources. In this post, I’ll cover the following tasks:

  • Create a new VPC
  • Create 4 new subnets (two ‘public’ and two ‘private’ split across separate availability zones)
  • Create an internet gateway to allow EC2 instances launched in the public subnets internet connectivity
  • Create a NAT gateway to allow EC2 instances launched in the private subnets to access  the internet
  • Create Route Tables to direct traffic to Internet/NAT gateways

This will be a fairly long post as there is quite a bit to get through, starting with creating the new VPC. I won’t be covering all the options available at each stage, but will go through getting a basic VPC set up.

To get started, once logged into the AWS console, Click Services then VPC. Then click the Create VPC button. In the window, enter the IPv4 CIDR block to be used for the new VPC: [click to continue…]

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VCAP6-DCV Design Journey – Objective 2.2 – Map Service Dependencies

August 17, 2017

This post is intended to cover the VCAP design objective around mapping service dependencies. At the time of writing, the required ‘Skills and Abilities’ listed by VMware for this topic are: Evaluate dependencies for infrastructure and application services that will be included in a vSphere design Create Entity Relationship Diagrams that map service relationships and […]

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VCAP6-DCV Design Journey – Objective 2.1 – Map Business Requirements to a vSphere 6.x Logical Design

August 14, 2017

This post is intended to cover the VCAP design objective around mapping business requires to a vSphere 6.x logical design. At the time of writing, the required ‘Skills and Abilities’ listed by VMware for this topic are: Analyze requirements for functional and non-functional elements Build non-functional requirements into a specific logical design Translate stated business […]

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Using Vagrant to Deploy Multiple VMs on vSphere

July 28, 2017

I wrote an article recently looking at how to deploy virtual machines on vSphere using Vagrant. On that post I covered how to deploy a single Photon OS virtual machine using Vagrant. Here, I wanted to do a quick post on how to deploy multiple VMs from a single Vagrant file. One way to do […]

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VCAP6-DCV Design Journey – Objective 1.3 – Determine Risks, Requirements, Constraints and Assumptions

June 28, 2017

This post is intended to address the VCAP design objective around determining risks, requirements, constraints and assumptions. At the time of writing, the required ‘Skills and Abilities’ listed by VMware for this topic are: Differentiate between the concepts of risks, requirements, constraints and assumptions Given a statement, determine whether it is a risk, requirement, constraint […]

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Vagrant, vSphere and Photon OS

June 26, 2017

I wanted to have a look at using Vagrant with vSphere to help provision a dev environment, mainly for an excuse to have a look at Vagrant. This post will cover the steps I used to get Vagrant up and running, and able to provision a VM on an ESXi host, via vCenter. To start […]

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VCAP6-DCV Design Journey – Objective 1.2 – Gather and Analyze Application Requirements

June 14, 2017

This post is intended to address the VCAP design objective around gathering and analyzing application requirements. At the time of writing, the required ‘Skills and Abilities’ listed by VMware for this topic are: Gather and analyze application requirements for a given scenario Determine the requirements for a set of applications that will be included in […]

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VCAP6-DCV Design Journey – Objective 1.1 – Gather and analyze business requirements

June 9, 2017

This post is intended to address the VCAP design objective around gathering and analyzing business requirements. At the time of writing, the required ‘Skills and Abilities’ listed by VMware for this topic are: Associate a stakeholder with the information that needs to be collected. Utilize inventory and assessment data from a current environment to define […]

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vSphere 6.5 – Upload log bundles to VMware direct from the vSphere Web Client

May 8, 2017

I stumbled across this new feature recently when working on a SR with VMware. It’s now possible to upload log files requested by VMware support directly from the vSphere Web Client. To do so, click ‘Administration’ on the menu, then ‘Upload File to Service Request’: From here you can select the file you wish to […]

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